Roskilde Festival Tops

Sigur Ros: I didn’t see or hear Sigur Ros, I experienced them. A purifying, serene concert that reverberated with an other-worldly character that no other musicians can pull off. Sigur Ros had the crowd spellbound from the word go.

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Chinese Man : The dons of French turntablism, Chinese Man were on peak form at their show at Cosmopol, in a performance that straddled the territories of dub, drum & bass, dubstep, classic reggae and hip-hop and included a visual show of epic proportions.

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Of Monsters and Men: Another Icelandic band whose music is a beautiful live experience. The Chamber pop visionaries showed why they are as popular a band as they are know with a well crafted performance at Roskilde’s arena

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Chase n Status: To think that drum n bass would headline one of the shows at the Orange stage and do so with such panache. A seismic cover of Rage of The Machine’s ‘Killing in the Name of’ was the highlight of their late night furore.

Chase-and-Status

Animal Collective: Animal Collective are the epitome of the modern day psychedelic band, complete with a trippy, kaleidoscopic show that transformed Roskilde’s Arena into a brilliant journey through sound and space. 

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Can Collectors Dancing At Roskilde Festival

Roskilde Festival is Scandinavia’s largest festival. Held in the pastoral town of Roskilde, the festival has hosted many impressive acts over the years. Unfortunately, the festival seems to have lost some of its original aims and as such, much of Roskilde today is all about drinking as much as one can and trashing the camping grounds, which are left in a miserable, tattered state of affairs at the end of it all. Part of the tidying up during the event itself takes place through the efforts of numerous bottle and can collectors who pick up empty beverage containers which they then cash in for money at different checkpoints around the festival. Such efforts aid the environment and the can  collectors themselves who rely on what they collect to earn a living. Many of these pant collectors come are part of ethnic minorities in Denmark, such as the Roma or Africans, the vast majority of whom are probably in the country illegally. In a form of money making in which there is little or no legislation to protect them, they often end up working under tough physical and psychological conditions. Furthermore, the sight of Roma or African people cleaning up after others only helps to reinforce negative cultural stereotypes in a world of racial hegemonies unjust, racially-influenced power structures. With this said, it was wonderful to come across two bottle collectors who broke the norms of their “roles” at Roskilde and joined in the party, like everyone else. Whether they put on this entertaining performance to earn more money through can collection or whether they were simply enjoying themselves as much as they could is immaterial. They spread some great karma at the Apollo stage, wowed the crowd and evinced the creative spirit that Roskilde festival is all about. I didn’t see Rihanna’s show at the Orange Stage create such a phenomenon, did you ?

Kraftwerk Roskilde Festival Orange Stage (Last show) July 2013

German precision, but little passion, from festival’s closing act

 
 
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Electronic pioneers Kraftwerk offered a 3D spectacle, but Roskilde’s decision to have them close the Orange Stage was nothing short of bizarre
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Cyborgs in a computer world: The Kraftwerk quartet before a sea of festival goers clad in 3D glasses (Katrine Emilie Andersen/Scanpix)


July 7 at Roskilde Festival, Orange Stage

To say that electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk are a band whose influence on modern music has been tremendous would be a gross understatement. The German quartet have inspired acts such as Blondie, Joy Division and Depeche Mode in a 40-plus year career that has seen them carve a name for themselves in the annals of electronic music.  They had the honour and challenge of being the last act to grace the Orange Stage at Roskilde this year.

Kraftwerk stepped onto Orange for what would be an engaging two hours through some of their best known content. Cementing their unique form of musical artistry, their live show was aided by free 3D glasses that were worn by most of the 60,000 or so revellers who showed up for the festival’s final big show in a scene that resembled a cult gathering of anonymous cyborgs gathered before the four stage silhouettes of the Kraftwerk quartet. The show began in a modest manner as a series of robotic tracks performed in the backdrop of a bewildering 3D show that added a creative interactive element to the performance.

As things progressed and the sky turned dark, Kraftwerk stepped up their game and delved deeper into their repertoire of driven, repetitive tunes, all the while backed by 3D visuals that contained numerous references to European culture and history, such as the Cold War conflict. A welcome break to the generally monotonic drone of beat sequences and synthesiser stabs came in the form of a lengthy performance of their ‘Tour de France’ track, which was flanked by excellent visuals that highlighted the cultural symbolism of the annual cycling event.  Lighter, more ephemeral beat foundations ousted the heavy, structural patterns that punctuated the better part of the show. This was a short-lived occurrence, however, as the robotic, alienated structuralist beat patterns returned all too quickly. In fact, whilst the show did indeed play on the themes of human alienation through technology, it appeared that Kraftwerk themselves seemed too alienated from the audience during their performance.

A lack of footage of the musicians in action behind their instrument panels was partially to blame for what seemed to be an unfortunate lack of interaction between the artists of stage and the crowd. Similarly, Roskilde’s bizarre decision to choose Kraftwerk as their closing act must be queried. Having seen the likes of Coldplay and Björk do their bit in the past to leave Roskilde Festival attendees with an emotional overload of epic, memorable moments, It was something of a disappointment to leave the Orange Stage after a performance that left many in search of the essential elements expected of a closing act.

Of Monsters and Men, Roskilde Festival Arena July 2013

Of Monsters and Men **** (4 stars out of 6), July 5 at Arena
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It wasn’t how they looked, it was the way they held the crowd

When Icelandic chamber pop maestros Of Monsters and Men performed on Danish soil for the first time last September at Store Vega, there were not that many people who had heard of the band and fewer still who defined themselves as fans.

Fast forward a few months. Roskilde Festival is kicking into gear on its second day and the event is alive and awash with a cheery vibe to suit all tastes. Of Monsters and Men are the third act of the day to perform on the Arena stage and the first to open the evening’s merry making.

The Icelandic quintet opened proceedings with the sun high in the sky, playing a set that consisted predominantly of songs off their 2012 debut album My Head is An Animal. Rather surprisingly they opted to unleash one of their marquee tracks ‘From Finner’ very early into the show, which was initially not that well received but by the end of it all had become an essentially catalytic element that set the tone for what would be a memorable evening.  In similar vain to ‘From Finner’, it took time for Of Monsters and Men to well and truly woo the crowd, but once they did, they had the concert in the palm of their hands, playing with a musical mastery that complemented the uniqueness of their folk-influenced music. Similarly, as was the case with last night’s final show at Arena by American psychedelic trio Animal Collective, poor acoustics at the start of the show tainted things somewhat, as lead singer Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir seemed to struggle to make her potent vocals heard.

The acoustics did improve however, and with the crowd enjoying themselves as much as they were, Of Monsters and Men went all in and unleashed their signature track ‘Little Talks’ at the peak of the proceedings, much to the delight of the partisan crowd who danced and shouted with approval. This and ‘Mountain Sound‘, another banger off the same debut album, underscored Of Monsters and Men at their best, an act who took up the baton from chamber pop pioneers Edwarde Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeros and popularised a genre of music that may well become a familiar fixture on the global music stage.

Roskilde Picks Day Three

With a schedule full of acts, it can be difficult to make choices. Our music writers give you their picks for today’s must-see concerts.
Day 3 offers arguably the best all-around line-up (Kasper Palsnov/Scanpix)
Although it is known as much for the camping, the partying and the “orange feeling”, believe it or not, for some people the Roskilde Festival is still all about the music.
With a full schedule across the festival’s seven stages, it can sometimes be hard to know when to go where. The Copenhagen Post offers our picks for each day’s best concerts, but any Roskilde veteran would caution against planning your schedule too carefully. Part of the beauty of the festival is stumbling across new acts and stepping outside of your musical comfort zones.
But if you are unfamiliar with some of the names on the schedule and want to know a little more, here are our picks for Saturday:
It will be a hip-hop extravaganza as Flatbush Zombies (pictured) join Action Bronson, Danny Brown and Joey Bada$$It will be a hip-hop extravaganza as Flatbush Zombies (pictured) join Action Bronson, Danny Brown and Joey Bada$$

Action Bronson / Flatbush Zombies / Danny Brown / Joey Bada$$

16:00, Cosmopol
Action Bronson: Arian Asllani, also known as Action Bronson, is a New York-based rapper with an interesting story. Previous to his accelerating rap career, Arian was an esteemed gourmet chef in the Big Apple’s culinary scene and his previous workings in the kitchen are clearly expressed in his works. Action Bronson leans towards the most unrefined, old school expressions of hip-hop, with an admirable nod towards the birthplace of the movement, namely New York. Releasing a new mixtape, Saab Stories ,this summer alongside Raekwon, Wiz Khalifa and Prodigy, there’s going to be plenty of press following its release so stay tuned. Michalis Nielsen / Daniel van der Noon
Flatbush Zombies: Although the emergence of the Zombies didn’t make it on to CNN, the release of their debut sent shockwaves through the hip-hop universe. Entitling their debut LP D.R.U.G.S. (2012) the inspiration behind their songwriting was hardly a secret. The blogosphere were the first to draw attention to the dawn of a new consciousness within the genre – namely the combination of hallucinogenic drugs and hip-hop. Moving away from ‘stoner rap’ and the age of Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and Xzibit into a new, buzzworthy territory brimming with densely visual lyrics, intoxicating instrumentals and some outstandingly original rap, the Brookyln brothers’ eccentricity is paying off in dividends. The duo will also be joined by Action Bronson, Joey Bada$$ and Danny Brown on stage. Daniel van der Noon
Danny Brown: Don’t let the wholesome-sounding name fool you, Danny Brown is not exactly a mummy’s boy. This young rapper from Detroit was described by MTV as “one of rap’s most unique figures in recent memory”. In 2011 he released the album XXX and received amongst other Metro Times’ ‘Artist of the Year’. He will be performing alongside great hip-hoppers Action Bronson, Flatbush Zombies and Joey Bada$$. It will be hip-hop heaven, so if you have a passion for rap you don’t want to miss this party. Sigrid Neergaard
If hours of yelling 'yo, yo, yo' aren't your taste, Efterklang provides a perfect alternative to the big hip-hop show If hours of yelling ‘yo, yo, yo’ aren’t your taste, Efterklang provides a perfect alternative to the big hip-hop show

Efterklang

16:00, Arena
In Danish, Efterklang is a word that connotes remembrance or reverberation. The shows of this Copenhagen trio are like those movie endings where what happens next is all up to you. At its simplest, Efterklang’s music is beautiful, tenderly-crafted chamber/dream pop. It’s the sort of music that you’d listen to at the end of a long and tedious journey or struggle, a pacifying current of contemplative influences replete with placebo effects.  Elements of remembrance and reverberation are sure to ensue in the wake of their show at Arena. Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk
Kvelertak
20:30, Arena
Kvelertak translates to chokehold in Norwegian, and the Stavanger-based sextet literally put you into submission with their raw blend of rock and punk paired with hardcore tendencies and black metal influences. Their music is balls to the wall energy that is executed in a confident and humorous manner. Despite singing in their local Norwegian dialect, their music has garnered a significant international following. Michalis Nielsen
Will Metallica save the day as hoped by festival organisers, or will the band show its age? Easily one of - if not the- most anticipated concerts Will Metallica save the day as hoped by festival organisers, or will the band show its age? Easily one of – if not the- most anticipated concerts

Metallica

22:30, Orange
Lars, James, Rob, and Kirk return to the Orange Stage after a ten year absence from the festival. With the late surprise announcement from Roskilde Festival, Metallica dethroned any of the previous headliners as the most anticipated show this year. Metallica’s unbeatable take on thrash metal will surely please nostalgic metalheads, as well as those who simply want to witness one of the most legendary bands in existence. Michalis Nielsen
Sigur Rós
24:00, Arena
Sigur Rós are back at Roskilde Festival after a seven year hiatus. Their ambient, distorted post-rock influences are some of the most uplifting in modern music, echoing vividly with the creative, untamed spirit of the beautiful country of Iceland. Paired with the shaman-like falsetto vocals of the talented Jonsi Birgisson, Sigur Rós are a cut above most bands out there. Their latest album, Kveikur, was released in June which means that Roskilde Festival will be one of the first major tests for it. New album or not, the Reykavik-based trio will almost certainly be one of the best concerts of the year.  Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk
Chase & Status:
02:00, Orange
Returning to Roskilde Festival only two years after their last visit is Chase & Status. This year, however, they have been given the responsibility of filling out the largest stage of the festival, the Orange Stage, where their show promises to be a lot bigger, sweatier and hotter than the last time. The British duo are on top of their game and have recorded music with huge names such as Rihanna, Tinie Tempah and Cee Lo Green. A digital single of their latest song ‘Lost & Not Found’ is due to be released on June 30. Sigrid Neergaard
With the hype bestowed on Angel Haze, one would think she could walk on waterWith the hype bestowed on Angel Haze, one would think she could walk on water

Angel Haze

02:15, Cosmopol
Though the name may suggest it, this American hip-hopper far from sugar coats her lyrics. She is best known for recording a cover version of Eminem’s ‘Cleaning Out My Closet’ in which she raps about sexual assault. Already twice this year – on two consecutive days in January – she released songs dissing Azealia Banks. As the two artists will both be playing at Roskilde and even at the same stage, it will be interesting to see if they have anything to say about each other, as well as who manages to rock the audience the best. Sigrid Neergaard

Roskilde Picks Day 1

Roskilde picks: Day 1

Original article- http://cphpost.dk/culture/roskilde-2013/roskilde-picks-day-1

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July 4, 2013 – 11:36
With a schedule full of acts, it can be difficult to make choices. Our music writers give you their picks for today’s must-see concerts.
There are plenty of options – and hopefully plenty of sunshine – in store for Roskilde fans (Photo: Scanpix / Torben Christensen)
Although it is known as much for the camping, the partying and the “orange feeling”, believe it or not, for some people the Roskilde Festival is still all about the music.
With a full schedule across the festival’s seven stages, it can sometimes be hard to know when to go where. The Copenhagen Post offers our picks for each day’s best concerts, but any Roskilde veteran would caution against planning your schedule too carefully. Part of the beauty of the festival is stumbling across new acts and stepping outside of your musical comfort zones.
But if you are unfamiliar with some of the names on the schedule and want to know a little more, here are our picks for Thursday:
Eloq will get the party started on the Apollo stageEloq will get the party started on the Apollo stage

Eloq

17:30, Apollo
The Copenhagener will almost be on his on home turf when he gets things kicked off on the electronic stage Apollo. He started an ongoing party at his previous Roskilde appearance, so expect nothing less from the young Dane this year. He is part of the hip-hop collective Chef Records along with Kidd, Klumben, Raske Penge and Top Gunn, all of whom are mainstays on Danish hip-hop fans’ playlists. Eloq was nominated for Politiken newspaper’s ‘Årets Upcoming’ (Upcoming act of the year) award earlier this year, but lost out to the band Lower. Sigrid Neergaard
The Lumineers
19:00, Odeon
The Denver, Colorado folk rock band The Lumineers make their debut at Roskilde Festival this year, and with a critically acclaimed album in tow, they hope to melt some hearts with their rustic Americana. One of the soundtracks of 2012 was ‘Ho Hey’, an instant singalong anthem. Look forward to belting it out with other admirers of simple but fantastic songwriting. Michalis Nielsen
Kendrick Lamar: The new king of the West Coast?Kendrick Lamar: The new king of the West Coast?

Kendrick Lamar

20:30, Arena
Hailing from Compton, California, Kendrick Lamar is a 25 year old hip-hop visionary deemed to be one of the most important personas in the newer wave of hip-hop that infuses electronic tweaks to the poetics of the street. The critically acclaimed good kid, m.A.A.d city shot Lamar to stardom. His narration of life experience through choppy delivery and abstract themes paired with lush beats is bound to be a key hip-hop experience at this year’s festival. Michalis Nielsen 
Chinese Man
20:30, Cosmopol
Chinese Man are one of the pioneering forces behind the recent upsurge of turntablism in France, a wave that has been surfed by the likes of acts such as Birdy Nam Nam, C2C and Deluxe. The trip-hop inclined trio hail from the multiethnic city of Marseille and paint from a palette that is rich in various music genres, from dub to jazz. Unsurprisingly, Chinese Man will be one of the bands leading the lineup of Roskilde’s intimate Cosmopol stage, where they will be one of the first to perform. Allan Mututku-Kortbæk
Jake Bugg has been likened to a young Bob Dylan - see for yourself if he lives up to the hypeJake Bugg has been likened to a young Bob Dylan – see for yourself if he lives up to the hype

Jake Bugg

21:00, Odeon
Hailed as the modern incarnation of an early Bob Dylan, his finger-picking blues supercharged with elements of early ‘00s indie rock ‘n’ roll, the 19-year-old Bugg will be among the youngest performers at the festival this year. A consummate professional who has already impressed the British public with a series of live television performances and festival concerts – including perhaps the most significant concert of his career at Glastonbury’s Introducing Stage when he was just 17 –  his jingle-jangle, carefree country-rock will convince the Danes that new-age British rock still has a lot to offer. Daniel van der Noon
Disclosure
22:00, Apollo
Brothers Guy and Howard Lawrence, aged 22 and 19 respectively, from the UK make up the funky, synthpop act Disclosure which only just released their debut album Settle on June 3 – so expect a hot performance. Settle took the UK by storm and went straight to the top of the charts and also landed at number two on America’s electronic charts. Their first single, ‘Offline Dexterity’, came out in 2010 and since then they have basically only produced hits. The duo seem to have a bright future ahead of them with plenty of fans and fame throughout Europe. Sigrid Neergaard
The Slipknot show promises to be as crazy as it looks The Slipknot show promises to be as crazy as it looks

Slipknot

22:00, Orange
The nine-man metal outfit are a household name at European festivals, and for good reason. Slipknot is one of the many bands that spawned from the nu-metal explosion of the late 90’s, but the Iowa band decided to push the boundaries of extremity to such an extent that they rose head and shoulders above their peers. Nine masked men provide terrifying theatrics to a cataclysmic musical experience and their misanthropic lyrics are delivered seamlessly by the charismatic Corey Taylor, a high-calibre showman. This should be one of the highest energy performances of the festival. Michalis Nielsen
Animal Collective
23:00, Arena
Formed by childhood friends in Baltimore in the late ‘90s, this quartet has had a palpable impact on the genre both collectively and individually – you’ll certainly know Panda Bear from his recent collaboration with Daft Punk on their exceptionally marketed new record Random Access Memories (2013). Steadily rising in popularity during the early ‘00s with their all-encompassing, genre-bending and visually evocative electronic-folk, their international breakthrough came in 2005 with the critically acclaimed full-length record Feels. Ever since, the group’s experiments have beckoned listeners even deeper into the visual realm of psychedelia. Daniel van der Noon

Roskilde picks: Day 2

Roskilde picks: Day 2.  original article at:

http://cphpost.dk/culture/roskilde-2013/roskilde-picks-day-2

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July 5, 2013 – 10:04
With a schedule full of acts, it can be difficult to make choices. Our music writers give you their picks for today’s must-see concerts.
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Plenty of choices for music fans on day two of the 2013 Roskilde Festival (Photo: Scanpix / Torben Christensen)

Although it is known as much for the camping, the partying and the “orange feeling”, believe it or not, for some people the Roskilde Festival is still all about the music.

With a full schedule across the festival’s seven stages, it can sometimes be hard to know when to go where. The Copenhagen Post offers our picks for each day’s best concerts, but any Roskilde veteran would caution against planning your schedule too carefully. Part of the beauty of the festival is stumbling across new acts and stepping outside of your musical comfort zones.
But if you are unfamiliar with some of the names on the schedule and want to know a little more, here are our picks for Friday:
It's early in the day, so don't be high as a kite when you watch HighasakiteIt’s early in the day, so don’t be high as a kite when you watch Highasakite

Highasakite

14:00, Pavilion
Flying on top of the skies is Norwegian indie pop band Highasakite. Vocalist Ingrid Helene Håvik, who writes most of the group’s music, is known for her mesmerising voice. The band just released their debut album All That Floats Will Rain last year which the music critics received with open arms and flattering reviews. The band prefers to dress in Indian clothing upon entering the stage and are said to put on very memorable shows. They are known for their catchy tracks and the EP In and Out of Weeks, which was released this spring, is no exception.  Sigrid Neergaard
Of Monsters And Men
18:30, Arena
Chamber pop, a sound popularized by the enigmatic Edwarde Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, looks set to become a genre in its own right thanks to Icelandic sensation Of Monsters And Men. The six-piece will be making only their second visit to Denmark, having played at Vega late last year. Expect plenty of epic sing-along moments and a concert that will linger in your mind for a very long time to come. Allan Mututku-Kortbæk
Catch living legend Bobby Womack on the Orange StageCatch living legend Bobby Womack on the Orange Stage

Bobby Womack

19:00, Orange
An active recording artist since the late ‘60s, the veteran soul singer Womack has had an enduring influence on the world of funk, deep soul and R & B throughout the decades. Sharing similarities with some of soul’s most prestigious figures – including Sam Cooke, Wilson Pickett and Otis Reading – Womack has been a part of a modern reemergence of nostalgic funk during the last few years along with such acts as The Temptations, Charles Bradley and Cody Chestnut. Daniel van der Noon
Rokia Traore
19:00, Odeon
One of very few African acts at this year’s festival, Rokia Traore is part of the modern wave of Malian musicians that includes Amadou & Mariam, Ali Farka Toure and Salif Keita. The widely travelled Traore has recently released her fifth album, Beautiful Africa, a work that represents a coming of age of sorts for her. This marks her third visit to the Roskilde Festival. Allan Mututku-Kortbæk
Maskinen
19:30, Apollo
This Swedish act got its Scandinavian breakthrough with the release of the upbeat hit ‘Alla som inte dansar’ (Everyone who doesn’t dance) in 2007. The song was impossible to miss in Denmark, but the Swedes have not been very visible since. They have toured in the US and Brazil but are now trying to get back on the Danes’ playlists. Their mixture of pop, rap, bass and electronic sounds are sure to start a huge party and you don’t need to understand Swedish to appreciate their beats and energy. Sigrid Neergaard
Easily the most controversial name on the bill this year, the pressure will be on Rihanna (and festival organisers) to deliver a strong showEasily the most controversial name on the bill this year, the pressure will be on Rihanna (and festival organisers) to deliver a strong show

Rihanna

22:30, Orange
One of the main names at Roskilde Festival this year is R&B mega-star Rihanna. She will be set to rock the crowd at the festival’s largest stage despite many Roskilde Festival enthusiasts being displeased with the booking, as the pick is more pop-orientated than the festival’s traditional picks. The young woman from Barbados broke through with her hit ‘Pon de Replay’ in 2005 and has since then delivered hit after hit. Over the years she has transformed from a sweet innocent girl into a sultry sex icon. Sigrid Neergaard
Tego Calderon
24:00, Cosmopol
Reggaeton is a genre that can easily become tediously repetitive, generic and flat-out boring, but not if you look towards one of the pioneers of the genre who sought to bring the Latin vibes from the poor neighbourhoods of Puerto Rico to a widespread global audience. Tego Calderón performs his steaming reggaeton with dignity, always pushing to open the boundaries of the hedonistic party music. Put on your dancing shoes for this year’s Latin party. Michalis Nielsen
Crystal Castles
01:30, Arena
Canadian punks Ethan Kath and Alice Glass form one of the most unique bands around, with their radical concoction of ethereal boundary-pushing electronic music. Their sold-out show at Vega earlier this year was one of the best the venue has played host to, replete with epic moments of crowd-surfing, as it cruised the fine line between untamed chaos and sheer genius. Crystal Castles have been touring non-stop for the last two years, so to say that they are an act in top form is a gross understatement. Allan Mututku-Kortbæk
Simian Mobile Disco
02:00, Apollo
Simian Mobile Disco may be a bit past their prime but are nonetheless still a force to be reckoned with in the intricate, erratic world of electronic music. Their live show is a maelstrom of chaotic musical arrangements strung flimsily together with aplomb. The duo have released a consistent string of albums over the years and collaborated with the likes of Florence and The Machine and the Arctic Monkeys and are an active component in the UK’s effervescent music scene. Brace yourself for a wild and hedonistic late-night show. Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk

Roskilde Festival Camping Feature 2013

Orange you glad it’s festival time again?

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Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk
July 3, 2013 – 20:03
Although the main music doesn’t kick off until tomorrow, the party has already been raging for days
From the opening of the gates last Saturday until the last musical notes are played Sunday night, the Roskilde Festival campgrounds are a frenetic – but beloved – mix of people, booze, noise, and mess (Photo: Scanpix)
It’s that time of the year again. The usually quaint, sedate town of Roskilde has turned into a temporary carnival, bursting with hordes of festival-goers from all over the world who’ve turned up to Northern Europe’s largest music festival. Roskilde is now in its 42nd year and has grown into one of the most respected events on the global festival circuit – and a blueprint for what can be done through good organisation, a fair bit of volunteering and excellent planning.
A complex festival of the size and scale of Roskilde is very much a multi-faceted affair, with numerous dimensions to it. One of the most discussed aspects of Roskilde is life in the camps, which for some is far from an ideal accommodation option. For many though, camp life is a fundamental and fun part of the Roskilde experience.
Chaotic from the word go
The start of the festival is always a hectic affair, as throngs of festival-goers flock en masse to the entrances to queue in long lines to be amongst the first to be allowed into the festival grounds when they open at 6pm on Saturday a full five days before the main musical aspect kicks off.
The early days at Roskilde are always hectic, as festival-goers race to be the first into the festival grounds when the gates open (Photo: Scanpix)The early days at Roskilde are always hectic, as festival-goers race to be the first into the festival grounds when the gates open (Photo: Scanpix)

Competition for a good camping spot is formidably fierce. For many years, organisers faced the problem of the fence being toppled over many hours before the gates were officially opened, though this challenge has been mitigated somewhat by fence patrols and stiff penalties for anyone caught trying to force entry into the grounds. Once the gates are open, the masses are free to set up their camps as they please. This too is a chaotic affair in which camps are assembled at breakneck speed and the pastoral fields around the village of Kamstrup are transformed into a colourful patchwork of pavilions and tents that will house the festival’s guests in conditions ranging from summer heat to torrential downpours.  Many camps appoint the fittest amongst their ranks to run with as many tents as they can carry and pitch whilst others wait at the gates with large amounts of camping gear, loudspeakers, stocks of alcohol and other festival essentials.

With the camps set up, the party has officially begun and for the five days before the large concerts start, festival-goers are largely left to their own ingenuity and imagination when it comes to keeping themselves entertained. There are, however, numerous activities to keep one occupied around the festival grounds during the warm-up days. This year’s features include:

Fixed Apollo Stage
Last year, Roskilde experimented with a mobile Apollo stage, which wandered from one camping area to another, night after night. This year, the stage has a fixed location (between camping area G and the music area) and will be hosting several acts a day in the lead-up to the main music period.
Maker Space workshop
As an antidote to the ‘if it’s broke, trash it’ culture that tends to underscore the philosophy of numerous Roskilde-goers, Dream City houses a temporary workshop that focuses on reuse and sustainability. Cheap solar cell mobile phone chargers and concrete ‘life-hacking’ advice are but two of the possibilities at the Maker Space workshop.
The Velvet State
A collaboration between performance design geniuses Fiction Pimps and Collective Unconscious, the Velvet State is an interactive art installation that is designed to take one through a vivid journey of different states of mind, in a boundary-pushing experiment that straddles the territory of the dreamy and the unconscious. The Velvet State is one of many art installations at Roskilde – all of which focus on co-creation and enticing the artistic spirits hidden within each and every festival-goer.
The Skate Park / Roskilde West
Roskilde West is the de facto cool location to hang out during the camping period. Home to both the skate park and Game City, this area is a vibrant mix of cultural activities and sports tournaments. Die hard punk rockers Hashbug rested their case for the ‘punk is not dead’ maxim on Sunday at the Skate Park, and with a host of different DJs behind the turntables every night, this is one location that consistently provides entertainment in the days before the big acts take over the festival.
With something for everyone at Roskilde, The Copenhagen Post caught up with some festival attendees for a quick chat about what camp life is all about:
(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)

Barbara Nino Careras
Hometown: Bogota, Colombia
Number of Roskilde Festivals attended: First time
Best thing about the festival?
“Definitely the people: they are open. They share, they love. Everyone is free, and there’s a lot of happiness around.”
What is camp life like?
“It’s difficult, but everyone is doing it and is part of the same shared experience, so it sort of balances it all out in the end.”

(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)

Niv Dayan
Hometown: Copenhagen
Number of Roskilde Festivals attended: Three
Best thing about the festival?
“People are really friendly. The feeling of happiness is just infectious.”
What is camp life like?
“I don’t really like the camp life that much. It’s loud, dirty and pretty grim, so I spend most of my nights at home, but I do have a tent pitched here just in case.”

(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)(Photo: Allan Mutuku-Kortbæk)

Edoardo Botallico
Hometown: Milan, Italy
Number of Roskilde Festivals attended: Four
Best thing about the festival?
“You become a different person. You lose the facade you have in everyday life which means you connect to other people as one ought to.”
What is camp life like ?
“It’s very basic and sometimes difficult, but you share the experience with your friends which is very beautiful.”