Visiting Barcelona: Part One – Architechture

Barcelona is always a city that inspires me. I’ve been to the Catalan capital several times now and endured everything from failed robberies in the Raval district to epic Monday nights out at Barcelona’s Apolo nightclub.

This time round, in the company of my family, my visit to Barcelona was a lot more sober. Yet, true to tradition, this city provided us with one remarkable twist of fate after another. Barcelona is also a city of contradictions – excessive tourism on the one hand and far-left protests against it on the other. Tourism in Barcelona is very much a double-edged sword – driving the local economy through massive annual earnings while eroding some of the city’s authenticity and heritage.

Barcelona is a city of contradictions – excessive tourism on the one hand and far-left protests against it on the other. Tourism in Barcelona is very much a double-edged sword – driving the local economy through massive annual earnings while eroding some of the city’s authenticity and heritage.

Similarly, in the midst of a decent city beach (La Barceloneta) that pulls many from far and wide, spectacular architechture and historic areas such as Barri Gòtic and Barri Gràcia, you will also find El Raval – a grimey quarter of town that is does has its charms but is defintely not the safest place to walk around in, particularly for women.

Over the coming blogposts, I will try to depict some of Barcelona’s conflicting facades through my imagery – covering  some of the well-known tourisy sites you may well have heard of, while also taking a look at some of the pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism.

While I was in Barcelona with my family, I was also unfortunately caught up in the van attack on Las Ramblas that left 15 people dead and wounded scores of innocent men, women and children. I will be covering this tragedy in separate post. My stance towards this episode is that I am humbled to be alive and grateful for the gift of life that we so often take for granted. But I am also angry and baffled – how can any one possibly contemplate an attack on the innocent of this nature and justify it in any way, religious or otherwise? The people that did this (most of whom got themselves shot dead) have no place in any culture – African, Spanish, Catalan, European or other. They know no religion and their affiliation to darkness paints an unspectacular if not worrying trail of

But I am also angry and baffled – how can any one possibly contemplate an attack on the innocent of this nature and justify it in any way, religious or otherwise? The people that did this (most of whom got themselves shot dead) have no place in any culture – African, Spanish, Catalan, European or other. They know no religion, Islamic or other and their affiliation to darkness paints an unspectacular if not worrying trail of deriliction in today’s society.

For now – here are the some of my pictures of Barcelona’s iconic architechture.

For more Barcelona posts, check out:

Visiting Barcelona: Part Two: No Tenim Por (We Are Not Afraid!) – surviving a terror attack

Visiting Barcelona: Part Three:  La Sagrada Famila- the quintessential never-ending work

Visiting Barcelona: Part Four: Bcn in street art: Mobile photography from the Catalan capital

 

Visiting Barcleona: Part Five: Throwback Time

Visiting Barcelona: Part Six: This is not a photo opportunity: The pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism in the Catalan capital

Casa Milà

Provença, 261-265, 08008 (Off Passeig de Gràcia)

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Casa Batlló

Passeig de Gràcia, 43, 08007

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Park Güell

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The Cityscape – as seen from Park Güell

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