My Hawaii in pictures – a visit to an otherworldly place

Hawai – land of Earth, air, water and fire. Of all the places I have visited, it stands out as one of the most spectacular. In many ways, I find it hard to believe that Hawaii is part of The United States – it seems so genuine and humble by comparison to the mainland. Here’s a video of one of my best trips yet, and a bunch of photos to boot.

 

Kailua Kona

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Hilo

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Kalapana

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Kīlauea

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Waipio Valley / Hawi

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Hapuna Beach

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Mauna Kea

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North Shore (Banzai Pipeline, Waimea Bay, Sunset Beach)

Banzai Pipeline

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Waimea Bay

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Sunset Beach

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Honolulu

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Visit Los Angeles in 60 Seconds

LA is a monster. No seriously – Hollywood’s home is massive – even from the air, where its concrete streets and square forms assume an outlandish, almost dystopian form.

On street level, you’ll find many potential X Factor fails who’ve never quite made it into Hollywood’s hallmarks but get by busking at tourist traps such a The Santa Monica Pier at the end of Route 66.

You’ll also find a smattering of celebs here and there, cruising its boulevards in their fancy wheels, oblivious to the reality of life in The Sin City of the West Coast. And then there’s Inglewood…

LA is not for me I must contend (less so after being detained by the immigration authorities who asked me all sorts of irrelevant questions despite my pre-approved ESTA application and valid travel documents).

Every cloud has a silver lining though – thanks to my good pal Paul, who showed us the best of LA in his purring Mustang, I must also admit that I had a great time cruising through the throbbing metropolis.

Here’s how it all went down on our visit to Los Angeles:

 

Introducing Sacred-Awe.com

It is with great pleasure that I introduce the website of one of my best-mates, Mischa Nielsen.

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Mulling over life’s complexities at Eataly, Ilum, central Copenhagen

Mischa and I met 7 odd years ago at Roskilde University, at the start of our bachelor studies. From the off, it was clear that we had many common interests, such as partying constantly and playing music. Over the years, we travelled to 7 different countries together, along with our good friend, Edoardo Bottalico, growing from enterprising pups to young men in the process.

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Mischa and I kiling it at a carnival party some years back

As bilingual kids in Danish society, Mischa and I share some of the same views about growing up in international environments and we both have an equally eclectic taste in music. His travails and love of food and wine have led him down the somelier route and i’ve wound up in content marketing but our passion for writing still unites us.

After toying with the prospect for a while, Mischa ha finally got his website up and running. Sacred-awe.com is a site that combines his favourite pastimes; writing, music and wine, inspired by Zorba The Greek no less.  Check it out after the jump!

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Gracias Cuba

In April 2017, I visited Cuba, a nation frozen in time, which (before that idiot Trump ascended the throne) was marketed as ” a place you have to see before it all changes.”

Cuba may be changing but I have no doubt that its soul will always remain true to its roots, for better or for worse.

And while Cuba is a photographer’s dream, make no mistake about it – this is a country in which travelling can be a veritable challenge, due to, amongst other things, two separate currencies for tourists and locals.

Here is what this beautiful nation had to offer us:

 

 

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Visiting Barcelona: Part Six: This is not a photo opportunity – the pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism in the Catalan capital

Barcelona is a fantastic city with plenty to offer every type of tourist, from palm-fringed beaches, to world-clas cuisine and a rich cultural heritage.It is little surprise, therefore, that the Catalan capital is as popular as it is. Last year alone, 9 million people stayed in the city’s hotels and a futrther 9 million

However, some would argue that there are too many tourists in Barcelona, so much so, that there have been recent protests against the rising tide.

I peronally love Barcelona and I understand that tourism drives a big part of the local economy. However, I can certainly comprehend the voices of locals who are tired of unsustainble, mainstream tourism, which is rife throughout the city. Here are some of my images of excessive tourism and its pitfalls in Barcelona.

To quote Banksy, “This is not a photo opportunity”

Visiting Barcelona: Part Two: No Tenim Por (We Are Not Afraid!) – surviving a terror attack

Visiting Barcelona: Part Three:  La Sagrada Famila- the quintessential never-ending work

Visiting Barcelona: Part Five: Throwback Time

 

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Visiting Barcelona: Part Four: Bcn in street art – Mobile photography from the Catalan capital

Barcelona’s street art, for me, is some of the best in Europe. The city’s Raval, Gòtic and Gràcia districts all contain plenty of powerful, sometimes obtrusive street art that reflects the tensions and strugges of the region.

Here are some of my photos of the Barcelona’s street art.

For more Barcelona posts, check out:

Visiting Barcelona: Part One: Architecture

Visiting Barcelona: Part Two: No Tenim Por (We Are Not Afraid!) – surviving a terror attack

Visiting Barcelona: Part Three:  La Sagrada Famila- the quintessential never-ending work

Visiting Barcleona: Part Five: Throwback Time

Visiting Barcelona: Part Six: This is not a photo opportunity: The pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism in the Catalan capital

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Camera : Iphone 3

Locations: Parque Guell, Caixa Forum, Barri Raval, Barcelona

Visiting Barcelona Part Five: Throwback time

The next article in my Barcelona series is a throwback to my last trip to the city in 2015 with 2 of my best friends. Barcelona was the first city of our road trip (we went on to Valencia and Ibiza thereafter). Thank you to our Catalan friends, Ares, Aina and Claudia, for hosting us.

Here are my pictures from Barcelona, August 2015. They are all from a lovely afternoon atop Turó de la Rovira (aka Bunkers del Carmel) – quite possibly the best place to get a 360 view of Barcelona, and thankfully, not yet popular amongst tourist or locals.

For more Barcelona posts, check out:

Visiting Barcelona: Part One: Architecture

Visiting Barcelona: Part Two: No Tenim Por (We Are Not Afraid!) – surviving a terror attack

Visiting Barcelona: Part Three:  La Sagrada Famila- the quintessential never-ending work

Visiting Barcelona: Part Four: Bcn in street art – Mobile photography from the Catalan capital

Visiting Barcelona: Part Six: This is not a photo opportunity: The pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism in the Catalan capital

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Visiting Barcelona: Part Three: La Sagrada Famila- the quintessential never-ending work

Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia has to be the epitomy of a work that will never be complete. While some may irk at its tendency to be covered in tarpaulins from time to time owing to the constant work on it, one can argue that it is this feature that makes it such a memorable place.

Work first began on La Sagrada Familia in the late 1800s. Catalan architecht Antoni Gaudí took charge of the design of the church in 1883 and worked on it for the next 43 years,  until his death in 1926. He was buried in the chapel of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in the crypt of the Sagrada Familia. Many more architechts have since taken  charge of the building process, which is estimated to come to an end later this century.

Here are my pictures of La Sagrada famila- a place of introspection, grandeur and bewilderment.

For more Barcelona posts, check out:

Visiting Barcelona: Part One – Architechture

Visiting Barcelona: Part Two: No Tenim Por (We are not afraid) – Surviving a terrorist attack

Visiting Barcelona: Part Four: Bcn in street art: Mobile photography from the Catalan capital

Visiting Barcleona: Part Five: Throwback Time

Visiting Barcelona: Part Six: This is not a photo opportunity: The pitfalls of excessive mainstream tourism in the Catalan capital

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